San Diego Business Journal

Restoring the Salk Is Both Art and Science

$9.7M Building Restoration Had to Meet The Approval of Stakeholders, Regulators By Brad Graves Originally published June 12, 2017 at 2 p.m., updated June 12, 2017 at 2:01 p.m.
   
Architect Louis Kahn used wood elements as a counterpoint to his monolithic concrete walls in the institute’s original buildings. Even the sturdy concrete walls of the 1960s-era structure have needed some repair. Photos courtesy of Salk Institute

Architect Louis Kahn used wood elements as a counterpoint to his monolithic concrete walls in the institute’s original buildings. Even the sturdy concrete walls of the 1960s-era structure have needed some repair. Photos courtesy of Salk Institute

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A refurbished window-wall at the Salk Institute. Photos courtesy of Salk Institute

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The Salk Institute’s teak window-walls are more visible from the west end of the plaza, as seen in this pre-restoration photo taken in 2013. Photo courtesy of Salk Institute

— The project of reviving the Salk Institute — the structure completed in 1965 on a canyon near the La Jolla cliffs — goes on much like any other major project in its labs...

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